Toren review

The Good:
  • Soundtrack is a perfect accompaniment to the action and adventure
  • The game’s short length feels like a bit of a blessing
The Bad:
  • Wonky camera angles and sticky controls make platforming a pain
  • The ill-fitting attempts at puzzles may as well have been left out entirely
  • A far too buggy experience
Toren review
Toren review
The Good:
  • Soundtrack is a perfect accompaniment to the action and adventure
  • The game’s short length feels like a bit of a blessing
The Bad:
  • Wonky camera angles and sticky controls make platforming a pain
  • The ill-fitting attempts at puzzles may as well have been left out entirely
  • A far too buggy experience
Our Verdict:

Toren tries to emulate the platforming storytelling of such classics like ICO, but doesn’t manage to perform in either category. Add a heap of game-crashing bugs on top of difficult controls and unsatisfying narrative, and it becomes hard to find a reason to recommend the game.

Reader Opinions
Log in or Register to post ratings.

A game could do a lot worse than to be compared to cult-favorite Ico upon its release. Team Ico’s seminal puzzle-platformer may be well over a decade old, but it has stood the test of time and is held in high regard by many dedicated fans. So when indie Brazilian developer Swordtales’ Toren was touted as featuring a similar approach in gameplay and graphics, I had reason to be excited. Instead, I found even more reason to be disappointed, experiencing three hours of tedious mechanics, a perplexingly unintelligible story, and average visuals, further marred by a variety of bugs and poor design decisions that are deserving of frosty reluctance at best.

The idea behind Toren seems initially promising. The game is set in a dreamlike world that is as colorful as it is surreal, and the young protagonist, Moonchild, finds herself on a quest to reach the top of the tower where she was born, to slay the dragon that dwells there. Though Moonchild’s objective is simple, it involves her climbing along the ever-growing tree of life, rising up through the inside of the tower as she incrementally ages from infant to young adulthood along the way. She must also navigate her own dreams, which are full of symbolism.

The whole thing plays out as an allegory, though to what is never made quite clear. Toren is an origin myth of sorts, to explain how the cycle of day and night came to be. When prideful Man built a tower that touched the sky, the sun grew angry and refused to set. Only a girl born in the tower can slay the dragon at the tower’s zenith and restore moonlight to the sky. That makes sense in principle, but the game does not do a good job presenting any sort of backstory or an impetus to go forward. The narrator – the man who raised Moonchild and now guides her from the Great Beyond – communicates exclusively in flowery, roundabout terms, essentially saying nothing at all that can be considered intelligible.

Toren’s narrative structure further suffers from a bad case of plot dyslexia. Nothing seems to gel; pieces of the story are haphazardly thrown at the player, to simply be accepted without any rhyme or reason. The lore may have been left intentionally vague, but ends up coming across as a garbled mess. You’ll learn of Solidor the hero in your dreams, whose connection to the events of the game seems tenuous at best. Then there’s the mysterious character who appears during the game’s climax with no introduction but who is nonetheless vital to your ultimate success. Moonchild’s growth and maturation from swaddled babe to young lady seems an afterthought, without any actual impact on the story or gameplay beyond the cosmetic change of what color wardrobe she is wearing. The list of question marks is extensive, but the characters and story are so poorly fleshed out, you’ll soon find yourself saying to hell with it, let’s just get on with things.

Unfortunately, getting on with things presents its own host of problems. I wish I could use words like “varied”, “engaging”, or even “fun”. But here too Toren is plagued with design choices depleting enjoyment at every turn. In essence, the game is divided into two sections. In the first, the “normal” waking world, Moonchild will run, climb, and hopefully jump her way across gaps to make her way to the top of the tower. With very few exceptions, this is a pretty straightforward task, though once or twice you’ll have to fulfill some sort of task, like lighting torches before you freeze to death or reaching a certain platform within a given time limit. But the jumping is frustratingly inaccurate, and you’ll often miss your landing due to wonky camera angles and finicky timing, and the tower, rather than being a strict up-and-down affair, features creative geography that will have you spending as much time platforming horizontally as vertically.

Then there’s the other half of the game, the dream sections. Oddly, Moonchild abruptly goes to sleep during her perilous quest, sometimes as the result of a hard fall or impact, other times out of the blue and for no reason other than that the narrator said so. These sections are slightly more puzzle-oriented, and could have been challenging given how poorly clued they are. But these sequences are of the puzzle-lite variety, and won’t offer much of a challenge to any but the most novice adventurers. Generally, they involve going somewhere and maybe getting back. In one instance, you’ll need to lead a stag to a sacrificial altar. Another time, you’ll have to navigate over an invisible sky bridge. Other than that, expect more of the same jumping and running you’ve been doing all along, just in much different surroundings.

Going up against a formidable foe like a dragon, who periodically descends from the top of the tower to hinder your progress, naturally requires some sort of weapon, and before long Moonchild will find a blade to aid her on her quest. This allows for an alternative to running around the pesky little critters that show up half a dozen times, though dodging them on foot is remarkably effective. The sword also protects you against the dragon’s petrifying scream, which will turn you to stone if you face it unarmed, sending you back to the last checkpoint. But even armed, some vigilance is still required, as wailing away at the dragon will eventually cause the sword to get knocked from your grasp, leaving you defenseless until you run back and reclaim it. Without your weapon, the petrifying shout can still be dodged by hiding behind statues and walls; similarly, a wind attack which will make you slide backward can easily be countered by clinging onto heavy objects in the environment. Though you face the dragon several times, each encounter follows the same pattern, without variation.

Continued on the next page...


content continues below

What our readers think of Toren

No reader reviews yet... Why don't you share your review?

Post review
review