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View Poll Results: Gabriel vs Guybrush
Gabriel Knight series 47 39.17%
Monkey Island series 73 60.83%
Voters: 120. You may not vote on this poll

 
 
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Old 11-27-2006, 12:04 PM   #61
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Gabriel knight 1:i didn't like it
Gabriel knight 2:it was great
Gabriel knight 3:haven't played yet!


monkey island 1:liked it
monkey island 2:that was great.
monkey island 3:loved it!

so in my opinion: monkey island series
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Old 12-01-2006, 02:47 PM   #62
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I haven't played any GK-games since they nowdays is so hard to find but I voted anyway on Monkey Island.

I agree with that's very strange to compare those games. Gabriel Knight's game are very serious and better would compete with games like Broken Sword or Indiana Jones and MI is more humorous and better match Leisure Suits Larry and Space Quest than GK.
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Old 12-02-2006, 03:47 AM   #63
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mrdriller View Post
I'll give GK3 a shot one of these days then, as long as Tim Curry's back, it's gotta be better than GK2.
Your reaction during the first hour will be "Eeek! Ugly!" and "How am I supposed to play this thing with this bad interface?"
Then the storyline will take over.
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Old 12-02-2006, 09:20 AM   #64
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Originally Posted by JemyM View Post
Your reaction during the first hour will be "Eeek! Ugly!" and "How am I supposed to play this thing with this bad interface?"
Then the storyline will take over.
I'd still prefer a better interface though. It would've been a much better game.
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Old 12-03-2006, 04:59 PM   #65
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Two quotes from this thread:

“For Adventure/ point n click Lucas are the godfathers”

“That said, I think LucasArts has had a bigger influence on the evolution of the genre than Sierra”

I wondered about these from a historical point of view. Didn’t Sierra publish the first (real) adventure game with graphics (Mystery House, 1980) and the first “animated 3D” game (King’s Quest 1984)? Lucas first real adventure was published in 1987 (Maniac Mansion). And Sierra published a point n click adventure in 1990 (King’s Quest V), the year in which LucasArts was still using the Scumm interface (The Secret of Monkey Island).
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Old 12-04-2006, 03:18 AM   #66
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Just got Sins of a Fathers today and played straight away and WOW! I haven't been this excited since Broken Sword 1. God, I hope this game is as good or better than the first 10 minutes I've played.
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Old 12-04-2006, 03:53 AM   #67
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Just got Sins of a Fathers today and played straight away and WOW! I haven't been this excited since Broken Sword 1. God, I hope this game is as good or better than the first 10 minutes I've played.
for me, it was great untill the very end (and including the ending)
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Old 12-04-2006, 04:03 AM   #68
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I'm thinking of pulling a sickie at work today now...
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Old 12-04-2006, 04:30 AM   #69
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Originally Posted by DEMON View Post
for me, it was great untill the very end (and including the ending)
Which one , the game has 2 endings.
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Old 12-04-2006, 06:38 AM   #70
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mart View Post
And Sierra published a point n click adventure in 1990 (King’s Quest V), the year in which LucasArts was still using the Scumm interface (The Secret of Monkey Island).
Not arguing with your other points, but SCUMM interface is generally considered to be an example of point'n'click.
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Old 12-04-2006, 09:05 AM   #71
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Glad you agree with the other points, as the correction of some wild assertions was the reason behind my posting. I expected more or less a comment about the point-and-click remark. I still made it, because I think it would be more precise to position the Scumm interface between the text parser and point-and-click interface. For the player is still interacting with the help of verbs and nouns, in stead of pointing directly at a (hidden) hot spot in the action window. But I have no problem with calling it Lucas Arts' “verb/noun point-and-click interface,” in contrast to the newer point-and-click interface (that Sierra was using in King’s Quest V).

Last edited by mart; 12-04-2006 at 09:19 AM.
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Old 12-04-2006, 09:24 AM   #72
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Lucas Arts wasn't first with point and click though.

MacVenture's first Deja Vu-game and Uninvited came before Maniac Mansion. I'm sure some other companies have tried with point and click also.
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Old 12-04-2006, 09:46 AM   #73
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That’s right, the Scumm interface, or “verb/noun point-and-click interface," had its predecessors. But the thread was about the comparison between Sierra and Lucasarts, and my posting about the assertions that LucasArts were the godfathers and had a bigger influence on the genre. The Scumm interface had less influence than the multicle–icon interface that Sierra used in King’s Quest V (in numbers of games that used those interfaces). And Kyrandia, developed while KQ V was developed (but published later), had already even a more advanced interface (one icon cursor).
To prevent further misunderstandings: types of interface are just possible means to try to determine the influences. But in fact I think that it is very hard to determine whether a company had a bigger influence than another one. Even when one only considers LucasArts games it is quite hard: did Monkey Island 1 have a serious influence on The Fate of Atlantis, or The Dig on Grim Fandango?

Last edited by mart; 12-04-2006 at 10:13 AM.
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Old 12-04-2006, 10:19 AM   #74
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Since some postings claim different I have to point out that GK3 has an excellent interface.
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Old 12-05-2006, 05:34 AM   #75
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Monkey Island fo sho.

Never really got into GK, played number 3 but lost interest pretty quickly.
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Old 12-05-2006, 09:26 AM   #76
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Burge View Post
Monkey Island fo sho.

Never really got into GK, played number 3 but lost interest pretty quickly.

1.) You should start with #1

2.) Give it a second chance.
The Beginning may be tedious and features some far-fetched puzzles.
But the game becomes MUCH better.
Great story and awesome puzzles. Just one word: SIDNEY
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Old 12-05-2006, 10:27 AM   #77
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I liked them both a lot, but MI was the first adventure that I played so I choose it.
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Old 12-05-2006, 09:44 PM   #78
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Tough one. I enjoyed both on many different levels. I would take GK. MI was good but GK kept me wanting more.
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Old 12-06-2006, 01:13 AM   #79
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mart View Post
That’s right, the Scumm interface, or “verb/noun point-and-click interface," had its predecessors. But the thread was about the comparison between Sierra and Lucasarts, and my posting about the assertions that LucasArts were the godfathers and had a bigger influence on the genre. The Scumm interface had less influence than the multicle–icon interface that Sierra used in King’s Quest V (in numbers of games that used those interfaces). And Kyrandia, developed while KQ V was developed (but published later), had already even a more advanced interface (one icon cursor).
To prevent further misunderstandings: types of interface are just possible means to try to determine the influences. But in fact I think that it is very hard to determine whether a company had a bigger influence than another one. Even when one only considers LucasArts games it is quite hard: did Monkey Island 1 have a serious influence on The Fate of Atlantis, or The Dig on Grim Fandango?
Well, if you say that the Scumm interface is the point'n'click equivelent of the text parser system, I could counter this and say that the multiple-icon interface is basically the Scumm interface with icons instead of verbs.

Also, not saying that the Scumm system was the original point'n'click interface, but I'd still say LucasArts had pretty much a bigger impact on point'n'click adventures than Sierra, as Sierra really didn't introduce point'n'click until after LucasArts did. Also, this is just my personal opinion, I find the verbs system much better than Sierra's icon interface.

The point is, LucasArts made pointing and clicking in adventure games popular, and really kickstarted the genre. Not to mention how it made adventure games a lot more universal, as I can imagine a lot of kids from countries where english isn't their mother tongue had problems with games that relied on english writing abilities. A lot of countries don't have localization in games and movies. I'm not suggesting Sierra didn't have any impact at all, they had a big impact - after all it's a pioneer. But Sierra mostly just followed suit. But I give them credits for making GRAPHIC adventures popular, as King's Quest surely was one of the first game that involved something more than just pictures with a text.
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Old 12-06-2006, 03:31 AM   #80
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Originally Posted by CrimsonBlue View Post
Well, if you say that the Scumm interface is the point'n'click equivelent of the text parser system, I could counter this and say that the multiple-icon interface is basically the Scumm interface with icons instead of verbs.
If you read my posting you will see I didn’t assert that the Scumm interface is the equivalent of the text parser interface. I said I would position it between the text parser and the point-and-click interface, but that I had no problem with calling it a verb/noun point-and-click interface.
And no, if you read my postings you will see that the multiple-icon interface that I was speaking about isn’t basically the same as the Scumm interface. You are referring to the window or bar in which the text icons (verbs and nouns) are replaced by object icons. And in this respect you are right. But I was referring to the multiple-icon cursor that the player used directly on (hidden) hotspots in the action window, and that is something different.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonBlue View Post
Also, not saying that the Scumm system was the original point'n'click interface, but I'd still say LucasArts had pretty much a bigger impact on point'n'click adventures than Sierra, as Sierra really didn't introduce point'n'click until after LucasArts did. Also, this is just my personal opinion, I find the verbs system much better than Sierra's icon interface.
Strange argument, for it doesn’t follow of course that LucasArts had a bigger impact on point-and-click adventures than Sierra because Sierra didn’t introduce point-and-click until after LucasArts did. The priority claim is something different from the impact. And as said – in terms of numbers of games – the multiple-icon cursor had a bigger impact.

Quote:
Originally Posted by CrimsonBlue View Post
The point is, LucasArts made pointing and clicking in adventure games popular, and really kickstarted the genre. Not to mention how it made adventure games a lot more universal, as I can imagine a lot of kids from countries where english isn't their mother tongue had problems with games that relied on English writing abilities. A lot of countries don't have localization in games and movies. I'm not suggesting Sierra didn't have any impact at all, they had a big impact - after all it's a pioneer. But Sierra mostly just followed suit. But I give them credits for making GRAPHIC adventures popular, as King's Quest surely was one of the first game that involved something more than just pictures with a text.
It may be the case that LucasArts made (verb/noun) point-and-click adventures more popular, but they didn’t "really kick started" the genre. As Rapp Sclallion pointed out in his posting, “MacVenture's first Deja Vu-game and Uninvited came before Maniac Mansion.”
If I understand you correctly, you say that Sierra made graphic adventures popular, and LucasArts made point-and-click adventures popular.
Of course, if one calls both the Scumm interface and the interface with the multiple-icon cursor “point-and-click interfaces,” one can assert that LucasArts made “point-an-click” adventures popular. But this is just based on definition, and describes the actual situation rather poorly. As we all know, the Scumm interface (and for instance Legend’s combination of the text parser and long list of given nouns and verbs) was a transition stage which resulted in today’s games with a multiple-icon or one-icon cursor. But if we distinguish, at least between to kinds of “point-and-click” interfaces, one with verbs/and nouns and one without verbs/nouns but with only a (multiple) mouse cursor to interact, the assertions about popularity and influence become quite different. And in terms of influence - which was the subject I was commenting upon – the Scumm interface didn’t have much influence and it didn’t last very long.
You say that the Scumm interface made adventure games more universal, and I agree it is easier to use some given verbs and nouns instead of having to formulate sentences or at least two words expressions in a text parser (“take bucket" etc.). But following this line of reasoning it must be said that the multiple-icon interface has made adventure games even more universal.
And: “Sierra mostly just followed suit”? You mean by introducing graphics in Mystery House, by introducing the first “3D animated adventure” in King's Quest, by making King’s Quest IV compatible with Ad Lib and Roland sound cards, by adding the multiple-icon cursor in King’s Quest V etc.?

My original reaction was about LucasArts being the godfathers of the adventure/point-and-click game and about LucasArts having a bigger influence on the genre. The first assertion is – as was shown - simply untrue, and I don’t think the second one has been proved the comments that followed. But I guess I pass now, as every comment seems to result in more misunderstandings.

Last edited by mart; 12-06-2006 at 04:57 AM.
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