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AG Community Playthrough #51: Return of the Obra Dinn

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I can see where the reviewer is going by the grid-puzzle logic. That’s essentially the process of deduction he is describing, and Obra Dinn uses it as its main feature. To me, that is precisely why it excels over most other adventure games which have you use a rubber fish on a blue toupee to get the magnetized paperweight required to get some other item. This game makes sense and plays fair. You know what the rules are and it doesn’t cheat.

The biggest difference (mentioned by cyfoyjvx in the opening post) setting apart from logic puzzles like that is that Obra Dinn doesn’t have any reading required to solve puzzles.

     
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rtrooney - 14 March 2019 08:41 PM

If you don’t think that exactly describes the type of puzzle I hate, as described in my immediate prior post, then you and I are talking a different language.

That’s exactly the type of puzzle we’re both talking about, yes, so we’re not talking a different language here. Tongue

So, yes I think the AG Review gave me an accurate, by his standards, explanation of what the puzzles would be like. And I declined to participate. You say the explanation was/is inaccurate. I’ll buy that, and I will certainly take a look at the YouTube you suggested. If I like it I may still not play. After all, most of the fun in playing these games is playing them with other people. Ergo: AGCPT.

Last question: If the review was so “off” in the description of the puzzle mechanics, why didn’t anyone catch the mistake

The mechanics behind the game (the methods of deduction and the logic involved) are not that dissimilar to that type of puzzle, so I definitely get the comparison.

But the giant puzzle that is Return of the Obra Dinn is still a different beast entirely.

There’s no 5x5 grid to complete, and the clues are in the things you hear and especially the things you see, so no weird descriptions.


The game is as follows (early-game spoilers to follow but since they’re from the game’s starting fifteen minutes, I’m not putting any spoiler tags):

The ship “Obra Dinn”, reported lost at sea, returns to port after several years. It’s badly damaged and the crew is long dead. It’s your job to investigate what happened to this ship and all of it’s crew members.

You have a list of all the crew members, their names, occupations, and countries of origin, and you have sketches of everyone, so you know what they look like. The list and the sketches aren’t linked, so knowing what someone looks like doesn’t mean you automatically know who it is.
The game consists of linking the names to the faces, and determining what happened to each of them.

To do this, you have a “magic” pocket watch - a “Memento Mortem” - that allows you to hear the last 10 seconds before a person’s death, and to see the exact moment of his death (in a freeze-frame that you can walk around in).

As the game starts, you find a skeleton in front of the Captain’s quarters. Using the “Memento Mortem”, you hear some men threatening the Captain, wanting to break into his quarters, and the Captain basically daring them to try. You hear a door opening and a gunshot.
And then you see that exact moment: three people standing outside the Captain’s quarters, one of whom has a bullet going through him that comes from the gun of the guy standing in the Captain’s quarters.

So now you know what the Captain looks like, and you know how the guy getting shot met his fate. You don’t know who he is yet, but that will be revealed later on. For now you can link a face to the Captain, and you have an unknown person that was shot by the Captain.

In the next two memories, you hear (and see) the Captain defeating the other two guys. And in the fourth memory, you hear the Captain lamenting to his dead wife that he just shot his best friend who is also her brother and the ship’s First Mate. The Captain says he’ll be with her soon and you hear a gunshot. And then you see that moment: two dead sailors in the Captain’s quarters, the First Mate dead just outside the door, a dead woman lying in a bed, and the Captain sitting next to her with the bullet of his own gun going through his heart.
This allows you to identify the previously unknown person outside the Captain’s quarters (which means you completed that guy’s fate since you know precisely who he is and what happened to him: he was the First Mate and was shot by the Captain). You also know what happened to the Captain: he committed suicide. And you know the identity of the woman in the bed, since she shares the First Mate’s surname (and there aren’t many women on the ship to begin with).

Every time you find a “new” corpse, you can use the pocket watch to hear and see how they died, and the information in those moments is used to identify everyone on the ship and to establish their fate.


It’s an intricate puzzle that has you on the lookout for names being called, languages being spoken, nationalities being mentioned, etc. What someone is doing is a good indication of what his job on the ship is, people with similar uniforms have similar jobs, some locations are only accessible to certain people (no seamen are allowed in officer’s quarters, for instance), etc.

You use whatever means the game provides you to identify everyone, while also getting brief glimpses of what happened to the ship - how it came to be damaged and empty.



All this to say that yes, the comparison with the 5x5 logic puzzle isn’t that far off, but the game is still a wholly different experience. And one I highly recommend, even if you don’t enjoy those 5x5 puzzles.

     

Now playing: Blade Runner (post-CPT) | The Witcher: Enhance Edition (on hold) | Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (on hold) | Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy (3DS)
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The game seemed more like one really big puzzle. I sadly, used a walkthrough when stuck, which was often.

I am back to the iPad and playing Book of Unwritten Tales 2 which is very different. State of the Art Graphics and traditional inventory based puzzle solving.

The indies are great due to many being really different and this one didn’t disappoint there.

I PC game on a Aspire one laptop that is six years old, I hope it can still play a few more games like this one before trade in time.

I am playing Nancy Drew 23 on it right now and that runs perfectly. Upgrading is always iffy, you could lose lots of your old games when you do.

And yes, I own 362 PC games.

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I enjoy playing adventure games on handheld systems- PS VITA, Nintendo DS and ipad mini.

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Glad to read that people enjoyed this wonderful game so much. I also felt the AG review was a bit unfair and misleading, but at least the game didn’t go unnoticed. Hope Lucas Pope will gather as many as awards as he can and continue experimenting with the genre.

     

PC means personal computer

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Doom - 15 March 2019 04:30 PM

Glad to read that people enjoyed this wonderful game so much. I also felt the AG review was a bit unfair and misleading, but at least the game didn’t go unnoticed. Hope Lucas Pope will gather as many as awards as he can and continue experimenting with the genre.

I hope so, but something tells me he’ll be moving on. Doesn’t seem like the kind of guy to rest on his laurels.

     
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Boy, what a treat. I finally stole a couple of decent play sessions and am slowly catching up. Something like 36 fates so far. And can’t stop solving new, the game is really addictive. I have been dying to play a proper detective game and Obra Dinn seems to do the job.

Some of the fates are hard to tell, but you have 60 of them to think about simultaneously so that didn’t make me stuck at all. I felt utter enjoyment when trying to figure blurry faces and nailing them (like the gunner and the gunner’s mate for example. not enough info about their names and profession to “reveal” their faces. but if you read carefully the crew members description and pay attention to the locations of the ship certain people are inhabitting you would clearly see these two fellas grabbing some guns from the gun storage and waving them around in lots of memories.) Little details like that made the game really enjoying and satisfying and gave you that detective type of feeling that you solved something yourself and didn’t just follow the narrative. And that’s what made it different from the 5x5 type puzzle it resembles at first glance.

Can’t wait to finish the whole thing.

     
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Alright. Finished. Better late than never. Not only the best adventure but the best 2018 game for me. Loved every bit of it and couldn’t stop thinking about it till I finished it. I had some minor troubles with deducting all the fates but managed to do it without walkthrough. Which means that the game was difficult and not frustrating at the same time. And that’s really bold and difficult to achieve. Kudos Lucas Pope.

Some of the more tricky fates I had trouble finding enough clues about:

1. All the living people who escaped with the boat. Where’s the clue that they went to Africa? I had to wild guess those.

2. I had to wild guess all the chinese topmen. I think I had enough clues only about one of them. The other ones I just wild guessed.

3. George Shirley was a really tricky one for me. When I had only a bunch of seamen left I didn’t have enough info about this guy’s name but with exclusion I though that this was indeed George. But somehow I couldn’t get his fate solved. That was because his other fellow by death, Christian Wolff (the gunner), was correctly approved by the game as dead by explosion. They both suffered the same fate, but the gunner can be approved by both explosion and shot by cannon, whereas George is only approved by a cannon shot. I finally guessed that this was the more appropriate cause of death, but I was in a big dead end before figuring that out.

4. John Naples was another tricky seamen. I figured out his name quickly but I find it hard to understand the reason behind his missing foot. At one memory he is falling of the stairs, at the other he is missing a foot and the Captain’s Steward was being taken away because of “madness”. Finally it came to me that this was the reason behind his madness (chopping John’s foot). But I didn’t quite get enough clues about it and I kind of count it as a wild guess.

5. There were other tricky ones which were really difficult but cleverly clued at the same time. Maybe that’s the case with the other ones I had troubled with and I just missed the clues (I’m pretty sure I missed many. so many characters had at least 2-3 different clues about their fate). I really liked discovering the unsolved disappeared members. You couldn’t see their death with the pocket watch so you had to locate manually the time and the location of their disappearance and look for clues in nearby memories. It was really clever. Like the fate of Charles Miner (the bosun’s mate) for example. He was really hard to identify. I did him almost last. You couldn’t see his death (or a visual link) anywhere in the other memories. But I always knew that the bosun’s mate was french and that he was torn apart. When I finally identified the guy, it all clicked nicely.

     
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badlemon - 17 March 2019 02:35 PM

Some of the more tricky fates I had trouble finding enough clues about:

1. All the living people who escaped with the boat. Where’s the clue that they went to Africa? I had to wild guess those.

The clues are in the book.
In the preface by Henry Evans, he asks to send the book to him upon completion. You’re asked to send it to an address in Morocco.
Morocco is also the closest from where the events happened on the ship if you look at the map, so that’s logically where the rowboat would have headed.

2. I had to wild guess all the chinese topmen. I think I had enough clues only about one of them. The other ones I just wild guessed.

In one of the memories, you could see them sleeping (with their crew numbers next to their hangmat). Their socks were visible, and they were all different. You could link those socks to the right person in the lightning memory.
I found that out afterwards, though. I identified them by guessing too. Grin

3. George Shirley was a really tricky one for me. When I had only a bunch of seamen left I didn’t have enough info about this guy’s name but with exclusion I though that this was indeed George. But somehow I couldn’t get his fate solved. That was because his other fellow by death, Christian Wolff (the gunner), was correctly approved by the game as dead by explosion. They both suffered the same fate, but the gunner can be approved by both explosion and shot by cannon, whereas George is only approved by a cannon shot. I finally guessed that this was the more appropriate cause of death, but I was in a big dead end before figuring that out.

There’s a second approval: drowned. If you listen closely, you can hear a fading scream right after the cannon goes off. Since there’s only one body in the explosion, I’m assuming George was blown out the porthole and the scream you hear was him falling overboard.
The game generally accepts both answers in more ambiguous situations.

4. John Naples was another tricky seamen. I figured out his name quickly but I find it hard to understand the reason behind his missing foot. At one memory he is falling of the stairs, at the other he is missing a foot and the Captain’s Steward was being taken away because of “madness”. Finally it came to me that this was the reason behind his madness (chopping John’s foot). But I didn’t quite get enough clues about it and I kind of count it as a wild guess.

I thought that it was obvious that the Captain’s Steward had cut off John Naples’ foot, but the big question for me was (and still is) “WHY???”.

5. There were other tricky ones which were really difficult but cleverly clued at the same time. Maybe that’s the case with the other ones I had troubled with and I just missed the clues (I’m pretty sure I missed many. so many characters had at least 2-3 different clues about their fate). I really liked discovering the unsolved disappeared members. You couldn’t see their death with the pocket watch so you had to locate manually the time and the location of their disappearance and look for clues in nearby memories. It was really clever. Like the fate of Charles Miner (the bosun’s mate) for example. He was really hard to identify. I did him almost last. You couldn’t see his death (or a visual link) anywhere in the other memories. But I always knew that the bosun’s mate was french and that he was torn apart. When I finally identified the guy, it all clicked nicely.

I’ve read that Lucas Pope used a special tool, basically a massive spreadsheet, to keep track of all the deaths chronologically in time, all the deaths in order of player discovery, and all the hints and clues for each crew member’s identity and fate, so he was sure that there was at least one clue for ALL crew members, and that all clues were pretty evenly spread across the memories…

     

Now playing: Blade Runner (post-CPT) | The Witcher: Enhance Edition (on hold) | Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (on hold) | Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy (3DS)
Recently finished: Whispers of a Machine (CPT) - 4/5 | Beneath a Steel Sky (CPT) - 3/5 | 3 in Three - 3.5/5 | Puzzle Gallery: At the Carnival - 2.5/5 | The Fool’s Errand (replay) - 3.5/5 | The Dig (replay) - 4.5/5 | Return of the Obra Dinn (CPT) - 4/5 | Beavis and Butt-Head in Virtual Stupidity - 3.5/5 | League of Light: The Game (CCPT) - 3/5 | realMyst: Masterpiece Edition - 2.5/5 | Contradiction - 3/5 | Tex Murphy: Mean Streets - 2/5 | The Last Express - 3.5/5 | South Park: The Fractured But Whole - 4/5 | Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (replay, CPT) - 5/5

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1. All the living people who escaped with the boat. Where’s the clue that they went to Africa? I had to wild guess those.

The clues are in the book.
In the preface by Henry Evans, he asks to send the book to him upon completion. You’re asked to send it to an address in Morocco.
Morocco is also the closest from where the events happened on the ship if you look at the map, so that’s logically where the rowboat would have headed.

Oh yeah, that’s right. Actually I only found out after nailing all the fates that the doctor was indeed the person who gave me the book. That’s why I missed the Morrocco hint. I know, stupid Smile

2. I had to wild guess all the chinese topmen. I think I had enough clues only about one of them. The other ones I just wild guessed. In one of the memories, you could see them sleeping (with their crew numbers next to their hangmat). Their socks were visible, and they were all different. You could link those socks to the right person in the lightning memory.

I found that out afterwards, though. I identified them by guessing too. Grin

Jeez…. their socks. I got the clue with the numbers. I identified that all the chinese guys were sleeping next to each other. But I didn’t look at their freaking socks Smile

 

 

     
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Hey. My mind is still going through several mysteries that more or less weren’t explained by the game narrative (or were slightly hinted and I missed it). I’m interesting what do you guys think about:

1. Where did Henry Evans get the watch from? I’m lead to believe that he didn’t have it at the beginning of the trip (he might have easily solved mystery around the death of the italian musician and prevent further tragedies). The other option is that he found it later on, slightly before the escape. Probably from the dead corpse of someone in the crew. Now who might that be? Probably there are more hints somewhere in the memories.

2. Were the shells on board from the beginning of the trip? I’m lead to believe that the Formosa passengers were carrying them inside the chest. But nothing really bad happened until the point where it was stolen and put on the boats. Obviously the chest has some superpowers (like stunning/killing the mermaids when you put your hand in it). Is the chest some kind of a Formosa secret artifact made to contain the shells safely without catching the attention of the sea monsters? Another interesting fact was that It-Beng Sia knew how to operate the chest and neutralized the mermaids with the cost of his life, whereas Fillip Dahl died without causing nothing else?

3. Who made the Kraken go away? Probably not the captain, as some of the crew members thought. Otherwise, there would be no point in the whole bargain chapter. Probably it was the third living mermaid who made a deal with the Third Mate. But why was he hurt by her then?

4. Why did the Captain kill only two of the mermaids and left the third one alive? Was he convinced by the Third Mate who was obviously more aware of the situation?

There other not so significant to the stories mysteries like the motives behind Fillip Dahl’s behavior, the cause of the mutiny and other minor stuff that I’m more than pleased to accept as an open to interpretation mystery but I’m pretty sure that there are hints about the points mentioned above.

     
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badlemon - 18 March 2019 10:18 AM

Hey. My mind is still going through several mysteries that more or less weren’t explained by the game narrative (or were slightly hinted and I missed it). I’m interesting what do you guys think about:

1. Where did Henry Evans get the watch from? I’m lead to believe that he didn’t have it at the beginning of the trip (he might have easily solved mystery around the death of the italian musician and prevent further tragedies). The other option is that he found it later on, slightly before the escape. Probably from the dead corpse of someone in the crew. Now who might that be? Probably there are more hints somewhere in the memories.

I’m of the opinion that Henry Evans had the watch the whole time.
Most likely as a closely-kept secret because it’s not exactly something you’d tell everyone about. Which probably means using it to examine bodies needs to be done covertly as well. Remember, we’re only getting it because his failing health didn’t allow him to investigate the ship himself.
So, in that regard, did he have a chance to examine the Nunzio’s body? If he didn’t, there’s no way he could have known/solved the mystery.

Having said that, even if he could openly use it to investigate, why did he need to? The crew’s Second Mate apprehended the Formosan killer who, according to the Chinese crewman’s translation, admitted to the crime. Evans had no reason to suspect this wasn’t the truth, so there was no reason to investigate further.
And by the time he could have grown suspicious of Second Mate Nichols (when the latter was returning with the rowboats, the Formosan chest and the unconscious mermaids), the shit was hitting the proverbial fan and all hell broke loose on the ship. From that point on, his focus was on helping injured crewmates, fighting off monsters and trying to survive. He couldn’t exactly investigate anymore then…

2. Were the shells on board from the beginning of the trip? I’m lead to believe that the Formosa passengers were carrying them inside the chest. But nothing really bad happened until the point where it was stolen and put on the boats. Obviously the chest has some superpowers (like stunning/killing the mermaids when you put your hand in it). Is the chest some kind of a Formosa secret artifact made to contain the shells safely without catching the attention of the sea monsters?

Best guess, yes.
And there’s a big difference between having the chest guarded in a cabin on a sizeable boat, and having it exposed in the open in a rowboat.
Either the mermaids were triggered when Nichols opened the drawer - right before he killed Nunzio - or they were triggered when the chest was on a rowboat.

Another interesting fact was that It-Beng Sia knew how to operate the chest and neutralized the mermaids with the cost of his life, whereas Fillip Dahl died without causing nothing else?

Exactly. It-Beng Sia knew how to activate the chest. The shells are contained in the drawers at the bottom. The top of the chest is the part with the quicksilver-like stuff that burns your arms off - as Filip Dahl found out. Without knowledge of the activating mechanism, it just killed him. It-Beng Sia knew how to activate it, but also knew that it would kill him, but I’m assuming he did it in an attempt to save Bun-Lan Lim (who was actually already dead at that time).

3. Who made the Kraken go away? Probably not the captain, as some of the crew members thought. Otherwise, there would be no point in the whole bargain chapter. Probably it was the third living mermaid who made a deal with the Third Mate. But why was he hurt by her then?

Yes, the third mermaid made the Kraken go away.
I’m assuming she attacked the Third Mate because she didn’t realize he was setting her free and returning the shell, and by the time she figured out what he was doing, he’d already been spiked.

4. Why did the Captain kill only two of the mermaids and left the third one alive? Was he convinced by the Third Mate who was obviously more aware of the situation?

If the Captain kills the third mermaid, then who is going to call off the Kraken? Killing the first two mermaids is precisely the threat he needed to force the third one to comply. “Do what I say, or you die as well.”

     

Now playing: Blade Runner (post-CPT) | The Witcher: Enhance Edition (on hold) | Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (on hold) | Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy (3DS)
Recently finished: Whispers of a Machine (CPT) - 4/5 | Beneath a Steel Sky (CPT) - 3/5 | 3 in Three - 3.5/5 | Puzzle Gallery: At the Carnival - 2.5/5 | The Fool’s Errand (replay) - 3.5/5 | The Dig (replay) - 4.5/5 | Return of the Obra Dinn (CPT) - 4/5 | Beavis and Butt-Head in Virtual Stupidity - 3.5/5 | League of Light: The Game (CCPT) - 3/5 | realMyst: Masterpiece Edition - 2.5/5 | Contradiction - 3/5 | Tex Murphy: Mean Streets - 2/5 | The Last Express - 3.5/5 | South Park: The Fractured But Whole - 4/5 | Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (replay, CPT) - 5/5

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badlemon - 18 March 2019 10:18 AM

Hey. My mind is still going through several mysteries that more or less weren’t explained by the game narrative (or were slightly hinted and I missed it). I’m interesting what do you guys think about:

I can’t resist replying, so I’m still posting in this thread although I said I wouldn’t. Shifty Eyed

1. Where did Henry Evans get the watch from? I’m lead to believe that he didn’t have it at the beginning of the trip (he might have easily solved mystery around the death of the italian musician and prevent further tragedies). The other option is that he found it later on, slightly before the escape. Probably from the dead corpse of someone in the crew. Now who might that be? Probably there are more hints somewhere in the memories.

There’s no way of knowing where he got it from, but you can see the case which you opened at the start of the game under the surgeon’s bed in chapter two. He also has the case with him when he leaves the ship in the lifeboat.

2. Were the shells on board from the beginning of the trip? I’m lead to believe that the Formosa passengers were carrying them inside the chest. But nothing really bad happened until the point where it was stolen and put on the boats. Obviously the chest has some superpowers (like stunning/killing the mermaids when you put your hand in it). Is the chest some kind of a Formosa secret artifact made to contain the shells safely without catching the attention of the sea monsters? Another interesting fact was that It-Beng Sia knew how to operate the chest and neutralized the mermaids with the cost of his life, whereas Fillip Dahl died without causing nothing else?

I blame greedy Miss Lim for everything that happened. I think we can safely conclude that she used her stunning chest to steal the shell from a mermaid before she got on board the Obra Dinn. The chest did catch the attention of the sea monsters when Nichols kidnapped Beng and Lim. The chest is only dangerous when the top is opened; the drawer is safe. Beng gets the shell from the drawer, opens the top and drops it into the quicksilver. So maybe the “stunning” only occurs when shell and quicksilver are combined. Dahl got the shell out.

3. Who made the Kraken go away? Probably not the captain, as some of the crew members thought. Otherwise, there would be no point in the whole bargain chapter. Probably it was the third living mermaid who made a deal with the Third Mate. But why was he hurt by her then?

Most certainly the captain. In the first part of the ninth chapter, immediately after The Bargain, John Davies tells the bosun that the captain chased the kraken off. He’s an officer, he would know. More importantly, the captain said he would kill all of the mermaids if they did not call off the kraken. The third one was alive, so she withdrew the kraken. Then the captain must have gone back to the main deck (where he heard the tragic news that his wife had died) and ordered the third mate to take a few men to the lazarette and release the mermaid. The death of Martin was more or less an accident. He said we are to set you free.* To me that sounds like he is following orders. And Paul is surprised that captain didn’t toss all the shells.

*ps: it would have been smarter to tell her that before grabbing her. Smile

 

     

I will kill every last one of you monsters!  Return of the Obra Dinn

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Thanks for replying, both of you. Things seems more in tact the way you describe it.
I’m still not convinced enough about the role of the Captain in the bargain. Yes, he did try to scare the last mermaid, but the whole bargain part was spoken by Martin. And it included the safe return of the Obra Dinn in exchange for her release along with the shell. The Captain only threat her with a death sentence, but I don’t think the mermaid would buy this easily. The Captain and his crew may have thought that it was his act of violence that sealed the deal, but it’s safe to say that not everybody knew the truth behind the whole mystery. But the case could very well be that the Captain and Martin acted together… not really sure.

     
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Sorry, I still think the only reasonable explanation is that the third mermaid gave in to the captain. Quoting John Davies *after the kraken had left*: Captain came up from the hold, said he’d chased it off. You don’t see Martin and the captain together; the watch tells you that Martin went down after the captain came up when the kraken had already left. And we don’t hear Martin speak to the mermaid before she spikes him, so when did he bargain with her about the kraken?

PS: Captain killed two mermaids and threw away their shells. The third one had every reason to believe he would kill her too.

     

I will kill every last one of you monsters!  Return of the Obra Dinn

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This dialogue here is what makes me think that maybe there’s more into Martin’s intentions.

[Moss]
“A third shell! Captain didn’t toss them all!”
[Perrott]
“Leave it. Help me lift this. Stop! Wait! We’re to set you free! Give it a shell.”
[Moss]
“Eh?”
[Perrott]
“Do it! Hoist it out. To the main deck. Throw it over. Lock the door when you leave.”
[Moss]
“Get the tail, boy.”
[Perrott]
“In return.. the ship… ...the Obra Dinn… ...see it home.”

I’m not saying that the Captain was unaware of Martin’s acts after the murder of the two mermaids. I’m just pointing out that it’s not strictly stated out and it could be open to interpretation. Crew member saying “Captain chased it off” could mean that both of them are mislead that threatening was what chased the Kraken off. After all I’m quite positive that the whole part of the bargain was “return of the obra dinn” in exchange for “releasing the mermaid and the shell”. He kind of decides at the moment to give the shell to the mermaid to make her unagressive. Martin could have been just following The Captain’s orders for setting them free. But he may have very well acted on his own. In a ship full of mad people, sea monsters, priceless magic shells and betraying crew members it seems kind of irresponsible to trust a job of such importance to someone else. And nowhere has been stated that the captain did more than killing those two mermaids. We only have a glimpse of Martin’s side of the story. Which is not enough for 100% conclusion.

     

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