• Log In | Sign Up

  • News
  • Reviews
  • Games Database
  • Game Discovery
  • Search
  • New Releases
  • Forums

Adventure Gamers - Forums

Welcome to Adventure Gamers. Please Sign In or Join Now to post.

You are here: HomeForum Home → Gaming → Adventure → Thread


   

Does playing of adv. games makes you more creative?

Total Posts: 2

Joined 2012-12-30

PM

What do you think? Solving the puzzles in these games requires creativity, but does it also improve creativity in real life - at work, in everyday life?

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 54

Joined 2008-04-03

PM

Depends on how creative and fresh are the puzzles (and other aspects of the game) to the specific player.

I’d say that the discovery of the adventure game genre as a whole can definitely do that to a person.

     

www.hardydev.com - blogging about indie and underground adventures

Avatar

Total Posts: 5891

Joined 2007-07-22

PM

Probably, as long as you don’t try to transport yourself with a “rubber chicken with a pulley in the middle” over the cable.


But I’d say there’re also some other neat benefits - every genre, but adventures specifically, feature plenty of historical themes, references… and places all around the world, which doesn’t have to scream “educational” but can really ignite the interest in players for that specific matter. I mean, if Atlantis was to show up suddenly just like it disappeared, I bet we adventure players would feel in there like at home. Grin

     

Recently finished: Four Last Things 4/5, Edna & Harvey: The Breakout 5/5, Chains of Satinav 3,95/5, A Vampyre Story 88, Sam Peters 3/5, Broken Sword 1 4,5/5, Broken Sword 2 4,3/5, Broken Sword 3 85, Broken Sword 5 81, Gray Matter 4/5\nCurrently playing: Broken Sword 4, Keepsake (Let\‘s Play), Callahan\‘s Crosstime Saloon (post-Community Playthrough)\nLooking forward to: A Playwright’s Tale

Avatar

Total Posts: 974

Joined 2007-02-23

PM

Wouldn’t say it makes me more creative in any meaningful way. However occasionally I do learn stuff from adventure games, like diego mentions with plots concerning historical moments and what not.

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 4011

Joined 2011-04-01

PM

I’m sure it does in some ways - solving puzzles and logic related reasoning. And I don’t even think it depends on whether the game is logical.

diego - 05 January 2013 04:52 PM

But I’d say there’re also some other neat benefits - every genre, but adventures specifically, feature plenty of historical themes, references… and places all around the world, which doesn’t have to scream “educational” but can really ignite the interest in players for that specific matter. I mean, if Atlantis was to show up suddenly just like it disappeared, I bet we adventure players would feel in there like at home. Grin

True. I didn’t have the slightest interest in Robin Hood until playing Conquests of the Longbow. Which doesn’t mean that now I’ll go out and buy a ton of books about him, but at least now I know the general story. Fiction or not (probably fiction), it’s an important part of English folklore.

     

Total Posts: 183

Joined 2008-03-28

PM

Not to mention how much we’re all experts on the templars.  Laughing

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 7623

Joined 2011-10-21

PM

I don’t think it helps improve creativity per se, but it probably improves logic reasoning.
Plus, like has been stated, adventure games can sometimes be somewhat educational, especially if the writer did his/her homework… Tongue

     

Now playing: Blade Runner (post-CPT) | The Witcher: Enhance Edition (on hold) | Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (on hold) | Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy (3DS)
Recently finished: Whispers of a Machine (CPT) - 4/5 | Beneath a Steel Sky (CPT) - 3/5 | 3 in Three - 3.5/5 | Puzzle Gallery: At the Carnival - 2.5/5 | The Fool’s Errand (replay) - 3.5/5 | The Dig (replay) - 4.5/5 | Return of the Obra Dinn (CPT) - 4/5 | Beavis and Butt-Head in Virtual Stupidity - 3.5/5 | League of Light: The Game (CCPT) - 3/5 | realMyst: Masterpiece Edition - 2.5/5 | Contradiction - 3/5 | Tex Murphy: Mean Streets - 2/5 | The Last Express - 3.5/5 | South Park: The Fractured But Whole - 4/5 | Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (replay, CPT) - 5/5

Total Posts: 124

Joined 2007-03-25

PM

Don’t know about others, but for me, playing AGs growing up helped me develop logic and the ability to understand and tell stories. They turned me on to literature and the craft of storytelling, which—in turn—led me to complete a college degree in English literature and journalism (which included some creative writing courses, in which I excelled). That degree led me to my career as a journalist. I’ve since told many that AGs played a huge part in my development into what I am today.

I still have a folder of stories I wrote in elementary school. And some of them contain plot elements and characters inspired by classic Sierra and LucasArts adventures:)

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 54

Joined 2008-04-03

PM

It always seems to me that adventure games teach logic only at the most basic level. The games put much more emphasis on skills like memorizing lots and lots of information and filtering it for clues, as well as finding creative solutions to problems.

That’s why I feel adventure games affect more our creativity than logical thinking.

     

www.hardydev.com - blogging about indie and underground adventures

Avatar

Total Posts: 7623

Joined 2011-10-21

PM

It’s also the best genre for non-native English speakers to improve their English skills… Thumbs Up

     

Now playing: Blade Runner (post-CPT) | The Witcher: Enhance Edition (on hold) | Danganronpa: Trigger Happy Havoc (on hold) | Professor Layton and the Azran Legacy (3DS)
Recently finished: Whispers of a Machine (CPT) - 4/5 | Beneath a Steel Sky (CPT) - 3/5 | 3 in Three - 3.5/5 | Puzzle Gallery: At the Carnival - 2.5/5 | The Fool’s Errand (replay) - 3.5/5 | The Dig (replay) - 4.5/5 | Return of the Obra Dinn (CPT) - 4/5 | Beavis and Butt-Head in Virtual Stupidity - 3.5/5 | League of Light: The Game (CCPT) - 3/5 | realMyst: Masterpiece Edition - 2.5/5 | Contradiction - 3/5 | Tex Murphy: Mean Streets - 2/5 | The Last Express - 3.5/5 | South Park: The Fractured But Whole - 4/5 | Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis (replay, CPT) - 5/5

Avatar

Total Posts: 514

Joined 2010-08-03

PM

diego - 05 January 2013 04:52 PM

Probably, as long as you don’t try to transport yourself with a “rubber chicken with a pulley in the middle” over the cable.

second that!!!

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 435

Joined 2012-03-30

PM

well if any game genre improves your skills somehow it’s definitely adventure games. For logic skills it depends on the puzzles in the game. I reckon some games with purely mathematical and logical puzzles so it can be compared to solving logic problems on your own. As far as creativity - it depends on the person that plays the game. I myself am pretty interested in visual arts and music so I find some adventures very inspiring for my own works. Not to mention the marvelous writing that some games have. Adventure games can be your guide as long as you want them to be. And last but not least at all - the recent indie adventure scene is made purely from fans of the genre. So you can say that adventure games helped them creatively to make their own games. And as we can see in some cases, it helped them pretty good.

     
Avatar

Total Posts: 911

Joined 2003-09-30

PM

     

“The universe is a dream dreamed by a single dreamer where all the dream characters dream too.”

Avatar

Total Posts: 198

Joined 2012-08-03

PM

@TimovieMan
It’s also the best genre for non-native English speakers to improve their English skills…

I definitely agree with that. :) I became “fluent” in English when I was only 10 years old, just after I started playing AG’s in 1990.

     

Anticipating:The Devil’s Men

Recently played:GK1 Remake (4), A Golden Wake (3), Child of Light (4) Memento Mori 2 (4) Face Noir (3.5) Tex Murphy: Tesla Effect (4) Blackwell Epiphany (4.5),Broken Sword 5(4.5), The Shivah Remake (4.5), Monkey Island 2 Remake (4.5)

Top 10 Adventure Games:Tex Murphy: Pandora Directive, Gabriel Knight:The Beast Within, Broken Sword:Shadow of the Templars, Gabriel Knight:Sins of the Fathers, Indiana Jones and the Fate of Atlantis, Tex Murphy: Under a Killing Moon, Lost Horizon, Grim Fandago, The Longest Journey, Blackwell Epiphany

Avatar

Total Posts: 1289

Joined 2012-07-15

PM

Like I’ve mentioned earlier, AG’s have been one of my main sources of inspiration as far as drawing and painting goes, so there is no doubt in my mind that they’ve inspired creativity in my life. Besides, figuring out all those puzzles and solutions requires creative imagination, and it makes sense that your level of creative imagination increases every time you excercise it. Whether or not you actually make use of it in other aspects of your life, I can only assume is individual.

     

Duckman: Can you believe it? Five hundred bucks for a parking ticket?
Cornfed Pig: You parked in a handicapped zone.
Duckman: Who cares? Nobody parks there anyway, except for the people who are supposed to park there and, hell, I can outrun them anytime.

Total Posts: 2

Joined 2012-12-30

PM

Interesting thoughts, but all depend on how creativity is defined. Some understand it as excellence in arts, but I rather understand it as “relating things that no one before thought to relate.”. For example, many technological and scientific advancements are being made this way. Also many jobs require creativity for problem solving. So “rubber chicken with a pulley in the middle” is not that bad, but probably too farfetched. I hate unreal puzzles.

     

You are here: HomeForum Home → Gaming → Adventure → Thread

Welcome to the Adventure Gamers forums!