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Adventure games for 7-10 year olds?

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I second Advie on EcoQuest: The Search for Cetus. It was, after all, mainly intended for children. Messages about the environment may be a bit hamfisted, but I guess kids are used to it nowadays, and it’s still an enjoyable game to play. Your daughter should be able to progress through most of the game on her own; perhaps some puzzles are a bit hard for a kid her age, but I think your dolphin friend gives you hints at times, and you can always leave some extra ones for her in a secret notebook or a simply coded file.

While we’re in the realm of older games, I’d suggest Inspectof Gadget: Mission 1 Global Terror. I have faint memories of it, but I’m positive it’s as kid-friendly as they come (Inspector Gadget is still in, right? Or am I completely out of touch with the younger folks Grin ?).
There’s also Eagle Eye Mysteries, a game about a kids’ club solving petty crimes around town, from lizard-napping to jewelry heist. Despite being terribly outdated (though the 90s are making a screaming comeback), it can still be a nice way to introduce a 7-year-old to point-and-clicks. I would hesitate to call it an adventure-game, but, well, it’s about gathering clues and making deductions, so I guess it can fit in the genre the way a proto-Sherlock Holmes would. And the cases are very short, so she’ll be less tempted to stay glued to the screen too long. This is definitely not the best game in the pool, but she’ll sure be able to solve the cases on her own, and they’re aplenty.

She might also be interested in the lightest games in the Nancy Drew series, such as Secret of the Old clock, or maybe The Haunted Carousel. She will definitely need to play it in Junior mode, in which she will have a detailed task list and hints from Nancy’s friends on the phone. Interface in older games has aged poorly, but I don’t know how it compares to that of the games you’ve tried, having never played them. Voice acting, on the other hand, is rather good, especially Nancy’s character.

     

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I would like to thank everyone for their suggestions! I’ve got a good list to go through and see if any look to be a good fit for my daughter. Please continue making recommendations if there are any more as they will be helpful for other parents trying to get their kids into point and click adventure games.

     
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I’d like to give you a little different idea for your daughter. Why not let her download demo games on Big Fish Games. A demo is free and plays for 60 to 90 minutes. Hidden object games are, for the most part, adventure light and 99% of them are family friendly. And they’re not difficult. Her reading levels would certainly be up to the task at 7. She would have the adventure play, plus hidden object scenes and fairly simple puzzles. She can skip the puzzles if they are too hard or don’t interest her. I let my grandkids download all the demos they wanted and when they found a game they really liked, I’d buy it for them. Big Fish also has tons of puzzle games like match 3s, TM games like Gardenscapes and some platformers. So she’d have a variety to choose and she could decide what genres are her favorites. It wouldn’t cost you anything. You would have to install the BF game manager but if you use Steam or GOG Galaxy, you know how that works. I did discover the hard way to sign out of my account before turning a kid loose. One grandson, a platforming wizard, could hit the BUY button as fast as lightening which is why I own all of the Super Granny games ever made. By the time the grandkids were 10 years old, they’d moved on to console gaming but BF gave them some pretty solid skills and a lot of fun.

     
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Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

Hidden object games are, for the most part, adventure light and 99% of them are family friendly.

99% of them are also, absolute garbage.  Naughty

     
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Headycakesofdoom - 07 September 2017 04:23 PM
Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

Hidden object games are, for the most part, adventure light and 99% of them are family friendly.

99% of them are also, absolute garbage.  Naughty

I disagree, most of them are not garbage at all & just present a lighter way of playing a game. There’s so much work that goes into producing a game whether a regular adventure, or casual which incidentally have for the most part far better graphics these days than many regular adventures.
So, I would agree with Jofog that most of them would be suitable for children as they’re easy enough.

     
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Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

She can skip the puzzles if they are too hard or don’t interest her.

7 years kid mostly smarter than we are Wink  if she like adventure games and its concept of believing in the world those adventures got, you wouldnt worry about her being stuck, but for more fun i would let my kid play games i already finished she can even call me at work to ask me about things and once she capture the idea of adventure games she will flow without my help.

     
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chrissie - 07 September 2017 04:42 PM
Headycakesofdoom - 07 September 2017 04:23 PM
Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

Hidden object games are, for the most part, adventure light and 99% of them are family friendly.

99% of them are also, absolute garbage.  Naughty

I disagree, most of them are not garbage at all & just present a lighter way of playing a game. There’s so much work that goes into producing a game whether a regular adventure, or casual which incidentally have for the most part far better graphics these days than many regular adventures.
So, I would agree with Jofog that most of them would be suitable for children as they’re easy enough.

       
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I had only been randomly following this thread. When I came back to suggest the casual games option, I saw the thread had taken a nasty turn. There are some series that might not be good for a seven-year-old, but most are very kid friendly. I would particularly look for games that are along the lines of “Fractured Fairy Tales” where the youngster is likely familiar with the basic story, and thus would be amused by the alternate take.

     

For whom the games toll,
they toll for thee.

Casual Game Developer List
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AohuMgk8BGFTdExjM2s4eGdJRGZmcWJxMUNoUTlMZVE#gid=0

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rtrooney - 07 September 2017 06:43 PM
chrissie - 07 September 2017 04:42 PM
Headycakesofdoom - 07 September 2017 04:23 PM
Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

Hidden object games are, for the most part, adventure light and 99% of them are family friendly.

99% of them are also, absolute garbage.  Naughty

I disagree, most of them are not garbage at all & just present a lighter way of playing a game. There’s so much work that goes into producing a game whether a regular adventure, or casual which incidentally have for the most part far better graphics these days than many regular adventures.
So, I would agree with Jofog that most of them would be suitable for children as they’re easy enough.

       
Heart This

I had only been randomly following this thread. When I came back to suggest the casual games option, I saw the thread had taken a nasty turn. There are some series that might not be good for a seven-year-old, but most are very kid friendly. I would particularly look for games that are along the lines of “Fractured Fairy Tales” where the youngster is likely familiar with the basic story, and thus would be amused by the alternate take.

There is a difference between casual games and hidden object games, isn’t there?

     
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Advie - 07 September 2017 05:07 PM
Jofog - 07 September 2017 04:20 PM

She can skip the puzzles if they are too hard or don’t interest her.

7 years kid mostly smarter than we are Wink  if she like adventure games and its concept of believing in the world those adventures got, you wouldnt worry about her being stuck, but for more fun i would let my kid play games i already finished she can even call me at work to ask me about things and once she capture the idea of adventure games she will flow without my help.

Agree on this, would do same
Exposure at early age shapes future tastes and expectations and yes i have seen kids playing titanfall2 at 8 to 10 let alone AGs

When she hits 10 or 13 , give her BlazingDragons and solve puzzles together
Also if you can buy her 3DS with Layton games, thats far more creative and better

     
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Oscar - 07 September 2017 10:18 PM

There is a difference between casual games and hidden object games, isn’t there?

Interesting question. In the beginning, when the Amazing Adventure and Big City game series were popular, Casual Games and Hidden Object games were virtually synonymous. Then Jane Jensen and her Floodlight Games started adding some minor plot lines to the HO scenes in Agatha Christie and Women’s Murder Mystery Club games. They were still Hidden Object games at heart, but, with the addition of a few puzzles and background story, the genre started to change a bit. Today, casual games are being produced with no hidden-object scenes. Azada in Libro, Penumbra Motel and the always-contentious Emerald City Confidential are examples. And the hidden-object scenes have also become more complex, and the scenes are better integrated into the story-line. In one of my favorite games, Enigmatis, I am hard pressed to remember a specific scene, even though I know there were a few.

So….Does a Casual Game require hidden-object scenes to be classified as a Casual Game? No. Would I call Casual Games that include hidden-object scenes casual? Yes. Are games that include nothing but hidden-object scenes still classified as Casual Games? Probably not.

A longer answer than you likely wanted.  Smile

     

For whom the games toll,
they toll for thee.

Casual Game Developer List
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AohuMgk8BGFTdExjM2s4eGdJRGZmcWJxMUNoUTlMZVE#gid=0

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I’d always considered HO games to come under the umbrella of Casual games as a specific sub-category?

     
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chrissie - 08 September 2017 01:16 PM

I’d always considered HO games to come under the umbrella of Casual games as a specific sub-category?

That was certainly the case in the beginning, but now I consider them a genre all their own. And that’s not a bad thing. The Amazing Adventure games have possibly the most beautiful graphics of any game genre. I love them. Similarly, match-three games and mah jong games often appear as puzzles in casual games. Often they are used as alternatives to hidden object scenes. But I don’t consider them a sub set of casual games either.

     

For whom the games toll,
they toll for thee.

Casual Game Developer List
https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AohuMgk8BGFTdExjM2s4eGdJRGZmcWJxMUNoUTlMZVE#gid=0

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Just found a upcoming adventure game your daughter might be interested in. Redwall : The Warrior Reborn ( http://store.steampowered.com/app/656030/Redwall__The_Warrior_Reborn/ ) This is an episodic series based on the Redwall books by Brian Jacques with three installments planned. It launches as early release on September 28, 2017. There are 22 books in the series if she’d like to read a little, too.

     
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Jofog - 13 September 2017 01:00 PM

It launches as early release on September 28, 2037.

Wow - so early? Smile

     
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Jofog - 13 September 2017 01:00 PM

It launches as early release on September 28, 2037.

Wow - so early? Smile

I’m surprised no one mentioned the Sierra classics Dr Brain series and Pepper’s Adventures in Time. There is also the Super Solvers series - not always 100% adventures but they are aimed at kids and are always lots of fun and great for learning. Two of my favorites are Gizmos & Gadgets and Midnight Rescue.

     

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