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DCastwalas74

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What are you reading?

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Joined 2012-08-05

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I’m currently reading Physics of the Impossible by Michio Kaku. Some of it is a little beyond my layman’s understand of physics, but it’s still a great read.

     
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Jelena - 08 August 2012 12:19 PM

Just finished Coraline by Neil Gaiman. It’s a pleasantly creepy children’s short story. Tsa lent it to me after my request for easy-to-digest novels for my vacation. Since I scare easily it was just the right degree of horror in order to still be able to sleep at night. Wink

Have you seen the movie? Smile

     
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DustyShinigami - 09 August 2012 09:04 AM
Jelena - 08 August 2012 12:19 PM

Just finished Coraline by Neil Gaiman. It’s a pleasantly creepy children’s short story. Tsa lent it to me after my request for easy-to-digest novels for my vacation. Since I scare easily it was just the right degree of horror in order to still be able to sleep at night. Wink

Have you seen the movie? Smile

No I haven’t. Is it good?

     

Lazy Bee
Temporary guest in your life.

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Finally my exam is over (badly, probably) and I also finished Veitikka (and Hitler escaped laughing on a plane to South America after having taught the Germans and Europe a lesson Tongue)

Anyway, I’m thinking of starting Wolf Hall by Hilary Mantel next

     
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Jelena - 09 August 2012 11:29 AM
DustyShinigami - 09 August 2012 09:04 AM
Jelena - 08 August 2012 12:19 PM

Just finished Coraline by Neil Gaiman. It’s a pleasantly creepy children’s short story. Tsa lent it to me after my request for easy-to-digest novels for my vacation. Since I scare easily it was just the right degree of horror in order to still be able to sleep at night. Wink

Have you seen the movie? Smile

No I haven’t. Is it good?

It’s great

     

An adventure game is nothing more than a good story set with engaging puzzles that fit seamlessly in with the story and the characters, and looks and sounds beautiful.
Roberta Williams

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Jelena - 08 August 2012 12:19 PM

Just finished Coraline by Neil Gaiman. It’s a pleasantly creepy children’s short story.

It’s definitely creepy but fun.  I haven’t seen the movie yet either, but it looks good.

I’m about half way through Stephen King’s The Wind Through the Keyhole.  It took me several pages to get back into the Mid-World mindset, but now I don’t want to put it down.  I like the story within a story within the main story. 

I also finished another of Piers Anthony’s Xanth books, Centaur Aisle, and loved it.

     

April, come she will
When streams are ripe and swelled with rain.

-Paul Simon

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Nocturnal - Scott Sigler

Scott Sigler was one of the early do-it-yourself authors. Gaining a lot of popularity by podcasting his novels and self publishing them on Amazon.

These days his books get a hardcover treatment. I had previously read his alien invasion horror novels Infected and Contagious and while they will never win any prizes for innovation or writing they were fun, fast paced gory horror with sci-fi trappings.

Nocturnal is more of the same.

This time it centres around Bryan Clauser (homicide detective) and a young boy who is being bullied. The city of San Franscisco has a serial killer on the loose. Someone is murdering people in brutal fashion and leaving strange occult symbols at the crime scene. How are Bryans strange dreams, the young boys drawings and a shadowy vigilante connected and why are the mayor and the chief of police going out of their way to cover it all up.

There is a secret war gripping the city and only Bryan can save the day.

Overall it was a fast paced novel that combines police procedural, a bit of San Franscico history and a whole lot of genetics and paranormal activity.

The characters were fine, Bryan seemed a bit one note angry cop, his partner Pookie was the funny one who held it together for most of the book and the young boy certainly grew throughout the novel.

The story was an intersting idea and due to the short couple of page chapters it moved with a decent pace towards the conclusion. Not a lot will surprise you and most people will see the twists coming but it didn’t stop me from having fun with it.

4/5

Next Up: Caliban’s War by James S.A Corey

     

An adventure game is nothing more than a good story set with engaging puzzles that fit seamlessly in with the story and the characters, and looks and sounds beautiful.
Roberta Williams

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Total Posts: 89

Joined 2005-12-19

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TimovieMan - 11 July 2012 02:43 PM

I thought it was quite well written, above being an extraordinary exercise in non-conventionism.

There’s a paragraph in “House of Leaves” that I’ve quoted many times before, simply because I love the quote so much:
“Who has never killed an hour? Not casually or without thought, but carefully: a premeditated murder of minutes. The violence comes from a combination of giving up, not caring, and a resignation that getting past it is all you can hope to accomplish. So you kill the hour. You do not work, you do not read, you do not daydream. If you sleep it is not because you need to sleep. And when at last it is over, there is no evidence: no weapon, no blood, and no body. The only clue might be the shadows beneath your eyes or a terribly thin line near the corner of your mouth indicating something has been suffered, that in the privacy of your life you have lost something and the loss is too empty to share.”

I’m not denying that it has its moments (and that’s a really nice quote), but the pseudo-academic style that is supposed to “poke fun at the academia” just comes across as pitiful and ridiculous, while the stream-of-conciousness commentary to me was just tiring after a while. I feel like it is, exactly as you said, an exercise in non-conventionism, but an exercise that doesn’t necessary succeed.

TimovieMan - 11 July 2012 02:43 PM

Reading a description of over a full page long of a stabbed eyeball whose fluids leak on the victim’s face… that’s just horrible yet brilliant at the same time…

I admit, that’s where I stopped. I enjoyed the overly descriptive nature of the book up to this very point, after which I felt like I won’t get anything useful or enjoyable out of the gory, explicit details, so I quit. That’s just not something I feel I have to waste my time with.

TimovieMan - 11 July 2012 02:43 PM

I’m a big fan of Orson Scott Card. I like his writing style, and I absolutely love the ideas he has. Ender’s Game is probably his most well-known work, but you should really check some of his short story collections, or the book “The Lost Boys”. Lost Boys is a bit like the film The Sixth Sense in terms of both story and atmosphere, but it was written ten years earlier…

I’ll do that, thank you.

     
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What are the best Stephen King’s books?
Any suggestion…?

     
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Joined 2004-01-18

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Locke & Key : Vols 4 & 5

Locke & Key is a series of comic books told in mini series format (each 6 issues) by Joe Hill (writer and son of Stephen King) and beautifully drawn by Gabriel Rodriguez.

It tells the story of the Locke family who after the murder of their father move back to the family home (Keyhouse, located in Lovecraft, Massachusetts). They find the house is full of secrets and magical keys, but also a maelevolant demon (Dodge) who has escaped and wants to find the Omega key.

This is a superb series full of humour, horror and some fantastic concepts. I have always thought that this series would make for an excellent adventure game. With the secrets in, around and below the house and the variety of keys that have magical properties it would make for some cool puzzles.

The Head Key allows you to open up the top of your head and see all your personality as little being running around. Want to remove all your fears and bad memories just take them out and put them in a jar. Want to learn something fast just cram that book in your head.

The ghost key allows you to open a door and when you walk through your spirit becomes free of your body and can roam free.

The Gender Key allows you to switch from Male to Female etc.

Vols. 4 & 5 sees more keys being discovered, the search for answers speeding up and a magical key that allows a look into the history of the Locke family and how the keys came into being.

A fantastic series that has 7 issues left to run

5/5

P.S they made a pilot episode for a proposed TV show based on the series, but it didn’t get picked up.

     

An adventure game is nothing more than a good story set with engaging puzzles that fit seamlessly in with the story and the characters, and looks and sounds beautiful.
Roberta Williams

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Joined 2004-01-18

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syberia - 11 August 2012 07:21 AM

What are the best Stephen King’s books?
Any suggestion…?

Personally I would say..

The Stand
IT
The Shining
Misery
Salem’s Lot

     

An adventure game is nothing more than a good story set with engaging puzzles that fit seamlessly in with the story and the characters, and looks and sounds beautiful.
Roberta Williams

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Total Posts: 89

Joined 2005-12-19

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Lucien21 - 11 August 2012 10:59 AM
syberia - 11 August 2012 07:21 AM

What are the best Stephen King’s books?
Any suggestion…?

Personally I would say..

The Stand
IT
The Shining
Misery
Salem’s Lot

IT
The Dark Tower: The Gunslinger
The Talisman
On Writing
11/22/63

     
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Joe the Barbarian - Grant Morrison and Sean Murphy

Joe is an imaginative eleven-year-old boy. He can’t fit in at school. He’s the victim of bullies. His dad died overseas in the Iraq war. He also suffers from Type 1 diabetes. One fateful day, his condition causes him to believe he has entered a vivid fantasy world in which he is the lost savior—a fantastic land based on the layout and contents of his home. His desperate attempts to make it out of his bedroom transform into an incredible, epic adventure through a bizarre landscape of submarine pirate dwarves, evil Hell Hounds, Lightning Lords and besieged castles. But is his quest really just an insulin deprived delirium—from which he can die if he doesn’t take his meds—or something much bigger?

Great little mini series that lasted 8-issues, collected here in the Deluxe Edition that really shows off Sean Murphy’s amazing art.

I liked the switching back from the real world to the fantasy world and the constant links of all his toys being alive in the fantasy world, fighting beside Picard, Batman, Transformers etc. It really made the reality or hallucination angle more interesting.

Is it all in Joes head, a Hypo dream or is it really happening.

It’s a wild ride.

5/5

     

An adventure game is nothing more than a good story set with engaging puzzles that fit seamlessly in with the story and the characters, and looks and sounds beautiful.
Roberta Williams

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Total Posts: 120

Joined 2006-06-23

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I just finished reading the first six issues of the new Suicide Squad, which wasn’t bad, though it didn’t quite hit my top floor, even for comic plotting. It’s not unworthy. Just not the best thing going.

I’m also rereading Scott McCloud’s Making Comics, which is by far the most helpful guide on comics making ever created.

And in novels, I’m still dallying with Stephen King’s Under The Dome, which got so heavy right in the beginning that I haven’t picked it back up in over a year. This does not mean I won’t read it; just that I haven’t been ready for it yet. The last novels I did complete reading were: Tigana by Guy Gavriel Kay and The Stratford Man Duology (Ink & Steel/Hell & Earth) by the amazing Elizabeth Bear. I’ve also been reading Throne of the Crescent Moon, by Saladin Ahmed, and I’m about to finally read The Red Tree by Caitlin R. Kiernan.

For light reading, I’m reading Dr. Denis Leary’s Why We Suck. I also have some old Douglas Adams and also some Terry Pratchett on the go. As you may have noticed, I tend to have lots of books on the go at once. Old habits die hard.

And Jelena, if you happen to be looking for recs in the Sci-Fi department, may I humbly suggest THIS?

     

Lee Edward McIlmoyle,
Probably NOT the kind of guy you think he is.

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Lee in Limbo - 12 August 2012 09:00 AM

And Jelena, if you happen to be looking for recs in the Sci-Fi department, may I humbly suggest THIS?

Wow, I’ll have a look into it! Thanks for the link Lee. Smile

     

Lazy Bee
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