Dracula: Origin review - page 2

The Good:
  • Graphically stunning
  • Some nicely inventive puzzles
  • Decent voice work
The Bad:
  • Widely varying puzzle quality
  • Highly linear
  • Repeatedly disrupts feelings of immersion
The Good:
  • Graphically stunning
  • Some nicely inventive puzzles
  • Decent voice work
The Bad:
  • Widely varying puzzle quality
  • Highly linear
  • Repeatedly disrupts feelings of immersion
Our Verdict: Whilst enough to help satisfy your cravings (for puzzle-filled adventures, not blood), Dracula: Origin isn't quite the material classics are made of.
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The game also has background music throughout which is normally in keeping with the atmosphere of each location. Genteel classical music plays in the English drawing room and more forbidding organ music plays in the castle. Whilst initially pleasant, I found these tunes grating after a while, in large part due to their constant repetition. The main reason for this is that the music restarts every time you change location, with scenes within a larger area often sharing a common musical theme. Worse, the opening section of each score plays on the main loading screen and then starts again when the section has loaded. Fortunately, there is a separate volume control for music so this can be turned down if desired without affecting the voices.

The control is standard point-and-click with four interactive cursors. The cursor constantly throbs red, which initially was confusing as it made it feel like I was pointing at hotspots all the time. This throbbing makes it harder to distinguish cursors quickly when sweeping the screen, leading to me to use the hotspot reveal option more often than not. Double-clicking on exit icons instantly transports you, which is a welcome option with Van Helsing’s leisurely walking speed. A journal of all the facts and documents discovered is automatically collected, including transcripts of all conversations. Van Helsing also has a doctor’s bag serving as a standard inventory. This bag must be an astounding item. I was impressed that it could hold a flaming torch and a six foot plank but there is one item in the game that far surpasses anything I’ve seen before. At one point Van Helsing, to all appearances, picks up a rolling library staircase about 3 times his own height! Both journal and inventory are just a mouse click away and it soon becomes a natural action flicking between these and the game world. Actions in the main view are equally straightforward, especially since appropriate cursors are selected for you over hotspots.

Right from the start, the game presents you with a nice assortment of puzzles to solve, and this variety continues throughout the game. Two particular puzzles stand out as examples of original and mind-taxing ideas. The first, early in the game, involves working out how to manipulate the lock on a magically sealed book. The second, much nearer the end, involves decoding the lock on the crypt of Dracula’s castle. In both of these puzzles you are given just enough information to solve them, but in a form that requires serious brain-work and experimentation to do so. As well as these standalone puzzles, there are plenty of other conventional activities such as gleaning information from other characters and combining inventory into new useful objects to keep you going. Whilst many of these are fairly standard adventuring fare, the majority are solidly implemented and the variety ensures you don’t get bored doing the same things over and over.

Sadly, the same high standard is not maintained throughout. For instance, an early puzzle requires you to identify wolves on a stone carving. The carving in question has so many creatures that could be wolves that this proves an exercise in frustration, a fact borne out by its regular appearance in hint forums. Some puzzle solutions are also highly contrived. Two in particular involve combining such bizarre items they made me laugh out loud. The other main problem with the puzzles is that almost all of them are blatantly "game" puzzles and not real-life obstacles. The wolf puzzle is one of four scattered across a graveyard. The effect of solving all four puzzles would have required a major feat of engineering covering half the graveyard to achieve. I find it hard to believe that a night-watchman and statue carver would have been capable of such a feat. This is a recurring theme, with many puzzles' existence completely defying logical explanation. I accept that this is a game, of course, but such obvious constructions constantly serve to remind players of the fact, limiting their ability to get sucked into the story.

But far worse in ruining the immersive atmosphere is Van Helsing himself. It is almost always impossible to act on information unless Van Helsing knows it, even if it is readily apparent to the player. I suffered a frustrating time near the end of the game because I hadn’t “looked at” some vital information, despite it appearing on-screen in letters an inch high. Until you have succeeded in generating an entry in the journal, it is best not to rely on any written information being usable. In a strange but equally disruptive contrast, he also demonstrates a near-psychic ability to detect things the player is unaware of. Over and over again, he would refuse to leave an area because he had “not inspected everything” or was “missing information”. I’d hunt around a bit more and, lo and behold, he was right, but there was usually no way I could have known about the items missed. I appreciate the desire to avoid dead ends and backtracking, but there are better ways of ensuring a player has everything they need. This also serves to reinforce how linear the game is, as these comments force you to stick to the path the designers have laid out for you. This, combined with Van Helsing's habit of talking directly to the player, usually after mistakes in close-up puzzles, made it seem less like I was controlling him and more like I was offering suggestions that he could take or leave.

Despite the criticism that prevent it from realizing its potential, this is by no means a bad game and could serve you well if you’re looking for something new to try. I consider the eight or so hours I spent playing were a reasonable investment of my time. It is glorious to look at and many of the puzzles are extremely satisfying to solve. The problem is, it rarely seems to rise above the level of satisfying. At times it felt more like I was playing a loosely strung together series of puzzles rather than an adventure. I expected a more immersive experience from a title so steeped in rich literary tradition and in this respect, Dracula: Origin fails to deliver. If you enjoy games like the The 7th Guest, where puzzles and plot are largely divorced, then you’ll probably enjoy this game. If you prefer a more integrated, story-driven experience, you are probably best leaving this one for a rainy day. No doubt Dracula will return to haunt us in future adventures, and I look forward to confronting the vampire again. I just hope he’s a little less retiring on his next outing.


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