Keepsake review

The Good: Logical and varied puzzles; beautiful visuals; interesting plot; excellent hint system.
The Bad: Prone to crashing; poor quality cutscenes; some suspect voice acting; lots of running involved.
Our Verdict: Keepsake is a charming adventure that overcomes its flaws and difficulties to be an enjoyable and magical experience.

Right now, it's a great time to be an adventure fan. In recent months, we've had a variety of comic adventures, engrossing horror stories, and mysteries to solve, in games both innovative and traditional. Whatever one's preference, there's been plenty to keep us occupied, and now we have Keepsake, which is catered to those who love fantasy settings and plenty of mind-bending puzzles. After the release of the UK version a short time ago, the North American version has finally arrived, and it is this edition being reviewed here. Offering a few important tweaks over its European counterpart, Keepsake has proven to be worth the wait, and comes recommended despite some flaws which prevent it from realizing its full potential.

After a required tutorial which is obviously geared to genre newcomers, the player takes control of Lydia, a young woman who has arrived at the Dragonvale Academy of Magic to begin her first day of school. Upon arriving, she discovers that her friend Celeste is not there to greet her as promised, nor anyone else at all besides a travelling salesman named Mustavio who has also just arrived. The castle is locked up and already a puzzle has to be solved in order to open the gate, which is only the first of many more to come.

What will strike you upon entering the castle is its sheer scale. The castle is a huge, formidable place that manages to make a person look like an ant in comparison, further emphasized by the magnificent dragon statue in the hallway. Thankfully, a map has been included for reference, which was sadly amiss from the UK version originally, and is really essential to prevent you from getting lost. Inside, there isn't a person to be found aside from Zak, the "mighty dragon" who has been transformed into a wolf by mischievous students. With Zak by your side, you must explore the castle and find out why the school is so mysteriously deserted and how to restore things back to normal. The storyline is a simple one that slowly develops throughout the game, and although it doesn't have any major twists and turns, it is nicely done and at times very moving.

As a sidekick, Zak is a great character. He is genuinely endearing and provides humour at opportune times with his fears of heights, ghosts and the basement. At certain points in the game, Lydia and Zak will have to work together to solve some of the puzzles, and conversations between them flesh out the two characters and add more to the story. There aren't many other characters you'll encounter due to the nature of the storyline, but those you'll see such as Elvander the magical tree and a trio of Guardian statues are interesting to communicate with. Despite promises of improved voice acting for this version over the original, Keepsake still has its problems, with Mustavio having the most exaggerated Italian accent you'll ever hear. Thankfully, the voices of Lydia and Zak are reasonable enough, which is a good thing as you'll be spending the bulk of the game in their company.

One of the most impressive aspects of Keepsake is the visuals. The natural surroundings of the castle are stunning to behold. Everything has a fairy tale feel to it, and the interior of the castle is appropriately ornate. Scrolls, banners and bookcases line the walls, and various rooms are adorned with medieval furnishings, fountains and statues. Manual machinery and water wheels generate power for the castle, while mechanical devices open gates and doors. The attention to detail is really impressive and although only a few sections of each room will ever be used by the player, having the additional fixtures add to the sense of being a lived-in academy. While some rooms appear similar on the lower levels of the castle, the scenery is a wonder to behold once you reach the upper levels, from castle spires basking in the glorious rays of the sun to the beautiful greenery featured in the outdoor classroom. It's the sort of thing that you expect to see in a storybook and the different settings of the castle make exploration really enjoyable. One room can actually change seasons and the effect is truly magical.

Where the visuals break down are in certain areas of the castle like the basement and stairwells, which appear unfinished and grainy. Another issue is with the sequences used to progress the storyline, which differ from traditional cutscenes by using still images accompanied by voiceover narration. These sequences have an intentionally faded look to differentiate them from the main game, but they are quite pixelated and lack polish. The voiceovers during these sequences aren't very impressive, either, with Celeste sounding as if she was reading from a script and Nathaniel, her father and head of the Academy, lacking any presence or authority. At certain sections of the game, there are short, animated cutscenes such as the growing of a flower or the movement of staircases, and although these are a nice touch, they also suffer from a reduction in visual quality. The 3D character models and animation are also relatively poor, often seeming crude and out of place against such detailed backdrops.

Musically, the pieces that play in the background are orchestral and calm, giving the game a relaxing feel while you explore. Quite often, however, music doesn't play at all while exploring the castle, but rather than this being a negative point, it adds to the intended feeling of abandonment, especially when you can only hear Lydia's footsteps echoing in the hallway.

Continued on the next page...

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Game Info

Keepsake

Platform:
PC

Genre:
Fantasy, Mystery

Developer:
Wicked Studios


Game Page »

United States March 29 2006 The Adventure Company
United Kingdom February 1 2006 Lighthouse Interactive


User Score

Average based on 8 ratings

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User Reviews

Posted by emric on Jun 1, 2012

STUNNING art direction & rewarding melancholy story easily overshadow a few weak spots

this is an amazingly beautiful game. the art direction is astoundingly good! haunting and desolate and beautiful. at times the artwork even... Read the review »



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Kim Wild
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