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-   -   How may I become a Game-Designer? (https://adventuregamers.com/archive/forums/telltale-developer-chat/14363-how-may-i-become-game-designer.html)

RasPutina 04-14-2006 11:02 AM

How may I become a Game-Designer?
 
well now I'm here at last and am able to ask my heros the questions I thought about since I read that I could talk to you here today.

How old were you as you begun as Game-Desingers? (or how you call this job)

Did you studied this or just "slipped in"?

In the moment I study Landscape-Architecture but since I begun to create my own adventure daily I realize more how much I love and enjoy working with my game. I'm really crazy about it and my greatest wish is to make it as a job.

I wand to finish my studies first, but have I to study Game-Design (or something like that) before I can make my wishes come true?

Where I can get connections, to come in contact with the "Community"? I dont care what kind of games, I just want to work with them, I'm in love with computer games.


I heard that Gamedevelopers get their music from real orchestres and buildings from architects... maybe they need a landscape architect?

But at most I enjoy writing the stories and figure out the lovely details that make the atmosphere. I'm not the best at graphics but able to learn.

So please can you help me, give me tips etc. for how can I work at the best Job in the world?



...sorry for my crazy english... its just my school english and I'm two years out of school now. I hope you understood me. :)

DaveGrossman 04-14-2006 11:08 AM

I became a game designer almost completely by accident in 1989. In those days, if you could program a computer, had some writing ability, and were willing to work for food, you could get a job at a game company and become a designer. No schools existed to teach game design, so you had to learn on the job, apprentice-style.

Nowadays it's a popular job, so it's a lot more competetive. And also there are schools that have game design programs! Heather went to one, in fact - maybe she'll talk about it....

Squinky 04-14-2006 11:12 AM

I'm in the same boat as you. I recommend reading this website for general information on becoming a game designer.

My guess is that most of the designers from Telltale don't have game design degrees. What usually happens is that people enter the industry through some other discipline (programming, graphics, testing) and then work their way up to a design position. In the meantime, you'll probably have to brush up on your writing skills as well; written communication is really important when it comes to creating design documents and such.

DesignerGreg 04-14-2006 11:20 AM

RasPutina - I'm sure you've noticed that Landscape Architecture is VERY close to level design... You're likely developing the 3D modeling skillls - so all you'd need is to get involved in something in which you can learn/develop/hone gameplay sensibilities - hopefully with something you can put on your resume. In a school environment, there are probably a few games being developed - I bet you could get involved with one of those and start learning by doing.

I was one of the lucky ones to move up from the test department at LucasArts. I had a film and theatre degree, and I've always played games.

-greg

HeatherLee 04-14-2006 11:37 AM

That site is a really nice resource!

I actually DO have a degree in something akin to game design. I went to The Georgia Institute of Technology and got a Master's Degree in Information Design and Technology. I studied games.

What the program really did for me was showed me a path to the right things to read and study, gave me the tools to make prototype games, gave me people to talk ideas over with, and gave me very valuable contacts (which eventually led me to this job). I found it extremely valuable.

I also think though that you can prepare yourself for a job in game design without neccessarily going through a program like this. But you have to be very organized and self-motivated. There are great books and articles to read (more coming out all the time), and programs and packages which make it easier and easier to construct your own games with limited programming and art skills. Read alot. Make games. This will help you soo much!

As for actually getting a job, you will constantly hear stories which equate to "I was in the right place at the right time" and when I had my sights on designing games, I found these stories very discouraging. But I have learned that you can help orchestrate the right place and time to come about. You need to get out and meet people. You also need to live somewhere where people make games. This is really important, because there are more likely to be game developer events and meetings where you can meet people, and gmae companies aren't usually going to be excited about helping you relocate.

Anyway, that's alot of information for one post so I'll leave it at that for now. :)

RasPutina 04-14-2006 11:41 AM

thanks for your replies, I'm looking forward the moment I end my studies. While it, I will spend all my time in learning better the programming and send my game(s) to magazines.

fov 04-14-2006 04:44 PM

What kinds of games do you make, RasPutina?

If they're adventures, you should post about them over in AG's Underground forum.

RasPutina 04-15-2006 11:38 AM

Actually I make an Adventure with AGS but it will take at least two years until it is ready. After this I want to make another Adventure or an RPG.

But it will be in german, if I dont find an good translator it will not release it in english.

Artik2 01-11-2007 11:37 AM

You will need a big team to make a good game... actual (and cool) games have a crew of 30+ persons.


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